Best Cookie Press

Cookie cutters are amazing, no doubt, and they have served in kitchens faithfully for decades. But making great, perfectly-shaped cookies with the exact amount of batter in every one of them, each one the exact same size so that the whole batch bakes perfectly… you need the best cookie press. It will make the cookie-making process not only easy but super fun as well.

What I have below are 10 presses that are, simply put, amazing:

Our Best Cookie Press In 2020

Product Disks Best For Highlighted Features
OXO Good Grips Cookie PressOXO Good Grips Cookie Press12Best Overall
  • Clear cylinder
  • Lever handle
  • 12 disks
  • Storage case for disks
  • Non-slip base
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Marcato 8307BLK Atlas Deluxe Biscuit Maker Cookie PressMarcato 8307BLK Atlas Deluxe Biscuit Maker Cookie Press20Best High-end
  • Mostly metal construction
  • ABS plastic pushing disk
  • 20 traditional cookie shapes
  • Available in multiple colors
  • Pretty
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Wilton Simple Success Cookie PressWilton Simple Success Cookie Press12Best Value
  • Plastic construction
  • Soft handle
  • 12 disks
  • Clear barrel
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Fante's 12007 Easy Cookie PressFante's 12007 Easy Cookie PressPlate with 5 shapesBest for Firm Dough
  • Metal construction
  • Shiny silver color
  • 5 cookie styles
  • Crank handle
  • Comes with Fante family recipe
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Material
Barrel
Handle
Base
Cleaning
Disks
OXO Good Grips Cookie Press
OXO Good Grips Cookie Press
Plastic
Clear
Push lever
Non-slip
Hand-wash
12
Marcato 8307BLK Atlas Deluxe Biscuit Maker Cookie Press
Marcato 8307BLK Atlas Deluxe Biscuit Maker
Metal
Opaque
Push lever
Metal
Hand-wash
20
Wilton Simple Success Cookie Press
Wilton Simple Success Cookie Press
Plastic
Clear
Trigger
Plastic
Hand-wash
12
Fante's 12007 Easy Cookie Press
Fante's 12007 Easy Cookie Press
Metal
Opaque
Crank
Metal
Hand-wash
Plate with 5 shapes
Wilton Preferred Press Cookie Press
Wilton Preferred Press Cookie Press
Metal &plastic
Clear
Trigger
Plastic
Hand-wash
12
Cookie Press and Moon Cake mold by Dltsli
Cookie Press and Moon Cake mold by Dltsli
Plastic
None
Press
Plastic
Dishwasher safe
6
Cookie Press Gun by KAMIDA
Cookie Press Gun by KAMIDA
Plastic
Clear
Trigger
Plastic
Hand-wash
16
Classic Cookie Press By Zulay Kitchen
Classic Cookie Press By Zulay Kitchen
Metal
Opaque
Push lever
Metal
Hand-wash
20
Cambom Clear Cookie Press Gun Kit
Cambom Clear Cookie Press Gun Kit
Plastic
Clear
Trigger
Plastic
Hand-wash recommended
16
Norpro Deluxe Cookie Press with Icing Gun
Norpro Deluxe Cookie Press with Icing Gun
Metal
Opaque
Push lever
Metal
Hand-wash
20

Things to look for before buying!

Most of the cookie presses out there are almost similar, with just minor differences in the models. It can be a bit hard to make the buying decision. However, when you are looking to buy a cookie press, you should keep certain things in mind.

While getting a cookie press, consider:

  • Durability
  • Ease of use
  • Easy cleaning
  • Number of decorative disks

Buying Guide

Some general things about a cookie press

When you head out to buy a cookie press, you are bound to have some questions. Even if this is quite a cheap gadget, no one wants to throw away money. So, of course, you have questions when you look at a couple or more of presses and wonder just how you should weigh your choices in order to land on the right one. Let’s address those questions now.

Types of material used in cookie presses

Like almost everything out there, you will find a cookie press in multiple materials. Some cookie presses are all metal, some are all plastic, and some are even a combination of the two. By combination, I mean taking almost equal parts of both materials, as metal presses have a bit of plastic and plastic presses have a bit of metal in them, generally speaking.

Plastic cookie presses:  Plastic cookie presses are almost entirely made out of plastic, which is generally ABS or PP, and BPA-free. The main body, which is the cylinder, the handle, the top and bottom rings, etc. are all plastic. The shaft that runs down the center of the barrel is commonly metal. The disks that accompany these presses are generally stainless steel or aluminum, but sometimes the disks are also made of plastic.

These presses should ideally not be used for dough that is too hard, as the extra pressure needed to squeeze out that dough might cause the top ring to pop off, causing damage, often irreversible, to the threads. A good thing about these presses is that they have clear, see-through barrels that allow you to see the dough in them at all times, eliminating guesswork on your part as to how much dough you are left with.

Metal cookie presses: These cookie presses are generally of aluminum or stainless steel. Almost all parts are metal, but sometimes the knob of the plunger is made of plastic. The disks that come with these presses are also metal, usually aluminum or stainless steel. The metal construction gives the presses a bit more durability as compared to their plastic counterparts, but still, you should avoid using any extra-hard dough as your press might break under the strain.

The part where these presses are a bit problematic is that their metallic barrels or cylinders are not see-through, so you need to keep an eye out on just how much dough remains so you don’t run out right in the middle.

Metal and plastic presses: These presses have a bit of both. Usually, they have a clear, plastic barrel which lets you in the know of how much dough you have in there at any given moment. The handles of these presses have some quantity of metal in them which makes them durable and easy to use at the same time. The top and bottom rings are usually metal, while the disks that accompany them are also normally metal.

What exactly is a cookie press used for?

This is a pretty self-answering question: for cookies. True, it is used to make cookies, but not just any cookies. It is used to make cookies that are uniform, are the exact same size and have the exact same amount of batter in them. Anyone who bakes cookies knows how hard it is to achieve a uniformity in cookies. Yes, you can use a cookie cutter for regular shapes, but the whole process of lifting the cut-out cookies and putting them on the tray somehow ends up damaging the cookies.

A cookie press, on the other hand, eliminates the whole process of dusting the surface, rolling out the dough to a uniform thickness, cutting out shapes carefully, lifting them up with a spatula and putting them on the baking sheet. All you have to do is roll up your dough, load it in the barrel of the press along with the desired disk of the shape that you want your cookies to be and then just press out your cookies directly onto the baking sheet. All your cookies will be equal in size, shape, and thickness, and will be made so much faster.

How do you use a cookie press for frosting?

Many cookie presses come with icing tips along with their regular disks. Instead of those disks, you just need to fix the nozzle that you wish to use in the bottom ring of the press and screw it into place. Then you can use the press in your regular manner. You might find crank handles or push levers a bit too difficult for frosting as you won’t have a lot of control, especially if you are a beginner to this. Gun-style cookie presses are much better suited to this type of work.

Cleaning a cookie press

Almost all cookie presses come with a ‘hand-wash recommended’ tag. If yours doesn’t, then you should still probably avoid the appliance anyway. Cookie presses have detachable parts, and the whole thing comes apart in seconds. Just unscrew the top and the bottom, remove the disk or the nozzle that you were using and proceed to hand-wash with warm, soapy water. Once you are done washing, dry the press completely, taking special care if your gadget is metal as you don’t want to lose it to rust.

Conclusion

With all possible questions answered and some great products reviewed, you can now pick whichever press seems the best for you and make amazing, yummy, consistent cookies in no time at all!

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