Best Bread Knives

The other day, I was slicing through a loaf of sourdough when the knife snagged in the middle. Now, this is a common occurrence. Every time I try to slice my bread not only do I get horrible, uneven slices but my crust ends up flaking off to boot. As I went online to find the root of my troubles, I found out that lots of other people face this too! And apparently, the only thing we are doing wrong is that we don’t have the best bread knife. What I needed all along was a sharp, serrated knife that was long enough to go through the entire loaf without making a mess in the middle.

And during my research I found 5 exquisite models:

Our Top Bread Knives

Product Length Best For Highlighted Features
Victorinox Swiss Army Victorinox Swiss Army 10.25"Best Overall
  • European steel
  • Patented Fibrox handle
  • Ideal 10-inch length
  • Pointed serrations
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Shun DM0705 Classic Shun DM0705 Classic 9"Best for Looks
  • VG - MAX Steel core
  • Ebony pakkawood handle
  • Japanese
  • Scalloped serrations
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Miyabi Kaizen Miyabi Kaizen 9.5"Best Japanese
  • VG - 10 Super Steel
  • Pakkawood
  • D - Shaped, comfortable
  • Medium-sized, pointed
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Tojiro F-687Tojiro F-68710.5"Best for Home Cooks
  • Lightweight
  • Scalloped serrations
  • Full tang
  • Extremely sharp
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Material
Handle - Material
Handle - Usability
Serrations
Profile
Length
Victorinox Swiss Army
Victorinox Swiss Army
European steel
Patented Fibrox Pro
Easy-grip
Medium-sized, pointed
Gentle curve
10.25"
Shun DM0705 Classic
Shun DM0705 Classic
VG - MAX Steel
Ebony Pakkawood
D - Shaped, Comfortable
Wide, scalloped
Gentle curve
9"
Miyabi Kaizen
Miyabi Kaizen
VG - 10 Super Steel
Pakkawood
D - Shaped, Comfortable
Medium-sized, pointed
Slight curve
9.5"
Tojiro F-687
Tojiro F-687
Molybdenum Vanadium
Pakkawood
Comfortable
Wide, scalloped
Gentle curve
10.5"
Wusthof 4151-7 CLASSIC
Wusthof 4151-7 CLASSIC
High-carbon Stainless Steel
Synthetic
Comfortable
Medium-sized, pointed
Slight curve
10"

5 Best Bread Knives

1. Victorinox Swiss Army

Victorinox Swiss Army
Highlighted Features
  • European steel
  • Patented Fibrox handle
  • Ideal 10-inch length
  • Pointed serrations
KitchenFaction Rating
5

As everybody knows, bread knives have an ideal length of around 10 inches. This means that you can slice your bread comfortably, and make thin slices of your ripe tomatoes without feeling awkward. This one, at just over 10”, has the perfect length. 

 

Material: It is made of European steel (which makes sense since it’s Swiss and all). That makes the knife lightweight and so you won’t be experiencing wrist fatigue because of this baby.

 

Handle: The handle is patented Fibrox Pro, which is an extended line of knives by Victorinox bearing said handle. The synthetic material makes the knife easier to grip, even with wet or greasy fingers. It doesn’t matter where you hold the handle from, it will provide a firm grip regardless. It is also designed to reduce tension in the wrist, so this combined with the lightweight European steel, makes for a very comfortable knife.

 

Serrations: The Victorinox has sharp and pointed serrations. This means that the teeth can grab onto the crust of the bread easily, and slice into it without making it flake off, which is the actual point of a good bread knife. The pointy teeth also keep a hold on the bread as you slice, so your slices aren’t wonky. The serrations also have scallops in between, which help in reducing friction so your slicing is even and smooth.

 

Sharpness: The Victorinox comes sharpened to perfection. The softer alloys in the European steel, not very high in Carbon, allow it to be sharpened to a fine edge. It retains its edge for a long time. The blade can be resharpened when needed, and the knife will give years of use if properly taken care of.

 

Weight: The knife is optimally balanced. It is lightweight and is easy to use, and the balance of it is well enough that it doesn’t tire out the hand. A good cutting feel is what leads to great slices!

 

Thickness: The blade is thin and flexible, but not flexible enough to create problems while slicing. Rather, the thinness of the blade contributes to the overall lightweight element of the Victorinox.

 

Multipurpose: This knife is of course not just limited to slicing bread. You can use it to slice your tomatoes paper-thin, or hack into a pineapple, or level your cakes. Its perfect length allows you to use it for various purposes.

 

Straight or curved: The Victorinox sports a gently curved blade that will allow you to make rocking movements on the cutting board which can be quite essential when slicing a, say, tomato as they make one’s job easier. 

 

Knuckle clearance: Since the blade is curved, the knife has a lot of knuckle clearance that is hard to find in straight blades.

 

Dishwasher safe: It is dishwasher safe, but it is recommended that you wash it by hand and dry it immediately in order to maintain its good health. Yes, you might feel like wanting to toss it in with a load of dishes but if you take care of your knife properly, it will last you years.

 

Aesthetics: The knife doesn’t win any prizes in the aesthetics department. It has a plain blade, with a plain handle. But service over beauty!

Pros
  • Ideal length
  • Patented Fibrox handle
  • Comfortable grip
  • Curved blade
  • Multipurpose
Cons
  • Dishwasher not recommended

2. Shun DM0705 Classic

Shun DM0705 Classic
Highlighted Features
  • VG - MAX Steel core
  • Ebony pakkawood handle
  • Japanese
  • Scalloped serrations
KitchenFaction Rating
5

The Shun, at 9 inches, falls in the ideal length as well. It’s neither too short to be ineffective nor too long to be awkward. It will slice through bread and level cakes with ease.

 

Material: This knife is made of the special Shun formula, the VG-MAX steel. 34 layers of stainless steel support the cutting core on both sides. It has cobalt for strength, tungsten for sharpness, carbon for durability, and chromium for prevention of erosion. A pretty hefty combination, in my opinion, like sugar and spice, and everything nice!

 

Handle: The handle is ebony Pakkawood. It is a combination of wood and plastic and is commonly found in materials that see a lot of wear, like knife handles. It has a D-shape when seen end-on, which allows you to have a comfortable, sturdy grip as you slice. It is durable and water-resistant. 

 

Serrations: The serrations are wide and scalloped, not pointed. They might not have a gripping power as strong as pointed ones, but the sharp edge more than makes up for it.

 

Sharpness: The Shun knife is extremely sharp. It cuts smoothly even though it has scalloped serrations which are supposedly not as good as pointed ones. The knife is so sharp it slides smoothly through bread with the least bit of pressure. The edge, in addition to being sharp, maintains itself as well. Shun also offers a free lifetime sharpening as long as you own the knife.

 

Weight: It is a lightweight knife, perfectly balanced so it won’t feel awkward in your hand. The weight is perfectly distributed which gives a great feel.

 

Thickness: The blade is thin and lightweight. The classic Shun steel is very hard, but not heavy enough to hamper your slicing.

 

Multipurpose: The knife can be used for things other than just slicing bread, like leveling cakes, slicing tomatoes and other soft fruits and vegetables.

 

Straight or curved: The Shun has a slightly curving blade which leaves you free to make rocking movements to better slice your tomatoes.

 

Knuckle clearance: The curve of the blade allows for better knuckle clearance. Your knuckles won’t knock on the cutting board with every slice as the curve makes for a wider range of motion. 

 

Dishwasher safe: The knife is dishwasher safe but it is recommended that you wash it by hand and dry it immediately afterward.

 

Aesthetics: It is a truly beautiful knife. The layered steel, in addition to giving strength to the blade, also gives it a rippling beauty. Aesthetics are not important when it comes to knives, but this one is strong in that area.

Pros
  • VG-MAX Steel
  • Curved
  • Comfortable, pakkawood handle
  • Knuckle clearance
  • Well-balanced
  • Pretty
Cons
  • Scalloped serration
  • Dishwasher not recommended

3. Miyabi Kaizen

Miyabi Kaizen
Highlighted Features
  • VG - 10 Super Steel
  • Pakkawood
  • D - Shaped, comfortable
  • Medium-sized, pointed
KitchenFaction Rating
4

The length of the Miyabi measures at 9.5 inches, which is close to 10 which means it’s in the perfect range. This length means it’s perfect for slicing bread, fruits and vegetables alike.

 

Material: The core is sturdy VG 10 super steel (which is supposed to have excellent edge retention) and is surrounded by 64 protective layers that give the blade a Damascus pattern.

 

Handle: The handle is made of Pakkawood. This particular composite is called Micarta, a combination of linen and plastic. It is very durable and is generally used for tool handles.

The handle has a D shape, generally seen in pakkawood handles. The rounded shape allows for easy handling and comfortable use. The woody texture means that the blade won’t slip easily from your grip, and repels moisture.

 

Serrations: The Miyabi has medium-sized, pointed serrations that effectively bite into the bread and hold it in place as you slice. The scallops in between the teeth allow the knife to move friction-free, making precise, clean cuts.

 

Sharpness: The blade is quite thin and honed to a very sharp edge. It will cut through the toughest crust without making it flake, and through tomato skins without reducing them to a pulp. It is likely to retain its edge, but in case it loses it just take it to a professional to get it sharpened. With proper care, this knife will last a long time.

 

Weight: The long, thin blade is balanced perfectly by the pakkawood handle and gives a good cutting feel.

 

Thickness: The Japanese blade, despite being very strong, is thin and does not weigh down your hand.

 

Multipurpose: The comfortable 9.5 – inch blade can be used to slice fruits and vegetables in addition to slicing bread.

 

Straight or curved: The Miyabi curves upward slightly at the end, which will allow you to slice in a rocking movement with no hassle.

 

Knuckle clearance: Since the knife is curved and not straight, it makes for more knuckle clearance as opposed to straight knives. You can slice comfortably without rapping your knuckles on the cutting board.

 

Dishwasher safe: This knife is not dishwasher safe. If you put it in there, the harsh soaps and jets will affect the knife negatively. It’s essential to wash it by hand.

 

Aesthetics: The Japanese blade is pretty to look at, with the ripples in the layered steel visible on the blade. The handle is also a nice touch. Even though the knife’s usability is more important than its looks, this one has both.

Pros
  • Good length
  • VG-10 super steel
  • Comfortable, pakkawood handle
  • Pointy serration
  • Knuckle clearance
  • Curved
  • Pretty
Cons
  • Not dishwasher safe

4. Tojiro F-687

Tojiro F-687
Highlighted Features
  • Lightweight
  • Scalloped serrations
  • Full tang
  • Extremely sharp
KitchenFaction Rating
3.5

The Tojiro has 10.5 inches in length, which is the perfect length for a serrated knife. It will slice comfortably through bread without the need to rotate and will slice your fruits and veggies without making you feel awkward.

 

Material: The knife is made of molybdenum vanadium steel. The molybdenum in it gives it strength, toughness, and resistance to wear, while the vanadium provides hardness. It makes for an excellent quality of steel.

 

Handle: The handle is made of pakkawood. It has three rivets to hold onto the full tang of the knife and gives a beautiful look. The handle is shaped in such a manner that it provides you with a comfortable grip as you slice and carve.

 

Serrations: The serrations on the Tojiro knife are wide and scalloped, not pointed. It might have a bit of a problem holding on to the crusts of very hard bread, as sharper teeth have a better ability to sink into the crust, no matter how tough, and facilitate the user to slice comfortably. However, the scalloped serrations mean that you won’t be having marks in your meat if you were to use the knife to carve roasts, like you might have with pointed serrations.

 

Sharpness: What the Tojiro lacks in serrations, it makes up in sharpness. If you think that the serrations might hamper slicing, the sharpness will help you meet your goal. It retains its sharpness as well. However, if it loses its edge over use, take it to a professional to get it sharpened.

 

Weight: The knife is lightweight because the blade is quite thin, and won’t stress your wrist. A lightweight knife with a strong, sturdy built… can’t go wrong with that!

 

Multipurpose: The ideal length of the Tojiro means you can use it to slice various things, when you are not slicing your sourdough. You can carve roasts, slice tomatoes and peel melons with your serrated knife as well.

 

Straight or curved: This Japanese knife has a gentle curve to it. The protruding belly of the knife means you can slice your tomatoes thinly with ease, and other things besides.

 

Knuckle clearance: As mentioned earlier, the knife has a curving blade. The curve will provide you with a good knuckle clearance, so your knuckles will be kept clean off the board as you go down to make the final move. It will prevent awkward final slicing as can happen with straight blades.

 

Dishwasher safe: The knife is dishwasher safe, but like most knives it is recommended that you wash it by hand. And don’t forget to dry it immediately afterwards. The blade might be stainless steel and the handle might be water-proof, but it doesn’t hurt to give your tools some extra care.

 

Aesthetics: The knife is quite pretty, even if the blade is plain and doesn’t show ripples like some other japanese knives. The full tang, riveted to the pakkawood handle thrice, gives an overall look that is pleasing to the eye.

Pros
  • Excellent length
  • Molybdenum vanadium steel
  • Curved blade
  • Knuckle clearance
  • Pretty
Cons
  • Scalloped serrations
  • Dishwasher not recommended

5. Wusthof 4151-7 CLASSIC

Wusthof 4151-7 CLASSIC
Highlighted Features
  • German construction
  • Made of a single piece of high carbon stainless steel
  • Looks gorgeous
  • Has a comfortable handle
KitchenFaction Rating
4

The Wusthof is a Germany-made knife, forged with a single piece of steel, that will make a pretty addition to your collection.

 

Length: At 10 inches, the last of my pick of knives is also a perfect length for a serrated knife; long enough to slice all types of bread comfortably and not so long that you feel awkward cutting anything other than bread. 

 

Material: The blade is made of high carbon stainless steel. Carbon provides strength to the steel so this makes for a sturdy tool. Instead of multiple layers like in case of some japanese knives, this is made of a single piece of steel.

 

Handle: The handle is black pakkawood, with three rivets into the tang. It is shaped so that it fits comfortably in your hand, and looks pretty to boot. The comfortable grip means you can control your movements better as you slice. It bears the red Wusthof trident as well.

 

Serrations: The Wusthof has medium sized, pointed serrations. The pointy teeth mean that the knife can grip onto hard crusts effectively, so the slicing won’t result in the crust flaking off.

 

Sharpness: This knife is very sharp, and the pointy teeth just add to the overall edge of the blade. The steel contains an alloy that helps the edge to retain itself over time, and when the blade dulls, you can always take it to a professional to have the edge brought back to full glory.

 

Weight: The knife has a thicker blade as compared to other, japanese ones and that, of course, contributes to its weight. But the fact that it is a bit heavy just adds to its overall feel. The heaviness gives a good, sturdy feel as you slice.

 

Thickness: The Wusthof uses a single piece of steel to forge the blade, so of course the blade is a bit on the thicker side. But it is optimally balanced, with the heavier blade helping with the slicing.

 

Multipurpose: Like most serrated knives, this one can also be used for various purposes. Its long length can be used to slice all types of loaves, as well as to carves roasts, level cakes, cut melons and the like.

 

Straight or curved: The knife lifts up at the end, giving it the gentlest of curves. As such, it falls between curved and straight categories.

 

Knuckle clearance: The curve may be very slight, but combined with the very cleverly constructed handle, it gives quite a bit of knuckle clearance. Your knuckles won’t run uncomfortably against the board as you get to the last bit of slicing.

 

Dishwasher safe: It is, like majority of knives, dishwasher safe. But the fact that you can pop it in there doesn’t mean you should. It is advised that you should avoid cleaning it in the dishwasher. Just clean it by hand and dry it immediately afterward to keep your knife gleaming and perfect.

 

Aesthetics: Like all Wusthof utensils, the bread knife is also drop-dead gorgeous.

Pros
  • Good length
  • High carbon stainless steel
  • Curved blade
  • Knuckle clearance
  • Good balance
Cons
  • Dishwasher not recommended

Things to look for before buying!

There are lots of things one considers when it comes to knives and if you are new to knives it becomes doubly hard to make a choice. Everything looks the same. But all that glitters is not gold, and a sharp eye is needed for a sharp knife.

When looking to buy a bread knife, you need to keep the following things in mind:

  • Serration
  • Length
  • Profile
  • Rigidity
  • Weight (balance)

Buying Guide

Why is a bread knife important?

A bread knife is a long, sharp blade that is serrated on one side. This helps you cut through your bread effectively and easily. The serrations grab onto the crust and help the knife slide into the bread without making the crust flake off. There’s nothing worse than slicing your fresh bread and having all the crust flake off! And that is why having a bread knife to slice your bread is important. Here is a blogpost about slicing bread perfectly.

What else to use a bread knife for?

‘Bread knife’ is a generic name given to the serrated knife, and just because we call it so doesn’t mean its function has to be limited to slicing bread only. The length of the blade, its high – strength steel reinforced by multiple elements like carbon, tungsten, molybdenum, etc. helps you use the knife for various purposes, like carving roasts, for example. A knife with scalloped serrations will give you smooth slices of roast while a knife with pointy serrations might leave slight gouges. The serrated knife can also be used for slicing vegetables like tomatoes and eggplant, and for cutting open fruits like pineapple, melon, jackfruit, etc. This knife is excellent for leveling cakes as well. Watch this video for more information on how to use a bread knife.

What types of saw-tooth edges are there?

The serrated knife comes in two types of sawtooth edges:

  1. Pointed serrations
  2. Scalloped serrations

 

Pointed serrations are little pointy teeth, extremely sharp with scallops in between them. The teeth grab onto the crusty surface of hard-crusted bread and facilitate the user to slice effortlessly. The scallops in between the teeth help reduce friction, thereby allowing a smooth slicing motion of the blade. The pointed serrations are especially good for bread with tougher-than-normal crusts.

 

Scalloped serrations are like a sharp wave all along the edge of the knife. Instead of pointy teeth, they are smooth scallops. They slide through the crust effortlessly, as well as through skins of soft vegetables and fruits like tomatoes. They might not be ideal for very hard-crusted bread, but if the knife is sharp enough, you won’t even notice the difference.

Why are the shape and length of the blade important?

The blade shape and the length of the knife are important factors to consider when shopping for a bread knife. The blade of the serrated knife is either curved or straight. Now, a straight blade is not bad, but it won’t allow you to make rocking movements as you slice your, say, tomatoes. And if you are a serious home cook, you will want to be able to make those rocking movements that make slicing easier.

 

A curved blade, on the other hand, allows a bigger range of motion as the curved belly of the blade allows you to rock back and forth and slice effectively.

 

The length of the bread knife is very important. Anywhere around 10 inches and you are good to go, but shorter than 9 inches or 9.5 inches, and you might end up regretting your decision because it won’t slice your bread as well as you would want it to.

How to sharpen a bread knife?

Most bread knives arrive very sharp at your doorstep, and with proper use and care, they retain their edge very well. If however, the knife ends up getting dull, which it eventually will over the years, it’s best that you take it to a professional to get it sharpened. Serrated knives are a bit of a challenge to sharpen and your manual sharpener might not be up to it and not all electric sharpeners can sharpen serrated blades. Here is a great blog about sharpening all sorts of knives.

If you sharpen regularly, and only need to touch up the edge, here is a great tutorial if you would like to sharpen yours at home.

How important is knuckle clearance?

Answer: very important. As you get to the end of the slice, you don’t want your knuckles to tap against the board. So it’s important that you see if the knife you’re getting provides knuckle clearance or not. Knives with curved blades generally allow a lot of knuckle clearance, as the curved belly of the blade keeps your hand clear of the board. Some straighter knives, as well, have such handles that they hold your hand at a curve, automatically away from the surface of the cutting board.

How to be safe around a bread knife?

Bread knives are very sharp. Their serrations are honed to such sharpness which allows the knife to slice through tough crusts like butter. Therefore, whenever you use it, be very careful. If you look away or lose focus you can slice your finger to the bone without feeling a thing. Of course, you’ll be feeling a lot later on. So it’s better to be careful in advance. Take care while cleaning the knife and storing it as well. Don’t put it in a drawer without a knife guard, as you might end up getting an involuntary gash as you reach for another tool in the drawer. Here is a helpful blog on knife safety.

How to clean a bread knife?

Many of the serrated knives come with a dishwasher safe card, but it is almost always advised that you skip the dishwasher when cleaning your knife. The dishwasher has harsh soaps and fast jets which throw the utensils into each other, and you might end up with a damaged edge well before time. The knife also might lose its luster and beauty if it’s not washed and dried properly. So it’s better if you just wash the knife by hand and dry it quickly in order to preserve its edge and luster.

 

There you have it, folks! I would personally recommend the Victorinox but you can choose any one of the five above and not go wrong. Have fun with your excellently sharp blades that don’t make your crusts crumble!

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